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From: N.Y.: New York City Employers Must Accommodate Pregnancy, Childbirth and Related Conditions

    

By cjackson@littler.com

On February 1of each year, employers covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) Injury and Illness Recordkeeping Rules1 must post the official summary of all injuries and illnesses occurring in the previous year. Employers must compile the information on the OSHA Form 300A or an equivalent and post it in a conspicuous place or places where notices to employees are customarily posted. The posting must remain up through April 30, 2014.

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From: Posting Deadline for Form 300A Summary of Work Related Injuries & Illnesses – February 1, 2014

    

By tgelbman@littler.com

The government is divided, congressional midterm elections are looming, and the President is approaching “lame duck” status. Although this political landscape may lead employers to assume that 2014 will be a quiet year on the legislative and regulatory front, the year ahead is shaping up to bring significant changes to workplace policy at the federal as well as state and local levels.

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From: Workplace Policy Institute: A Look Ahead to Legislative and Regulatory Changes in 2014

    

By cjackson@littler.com

In 2010, the New Jersey Supreme Court created a qualified privilege for an employee taking documents to support an employment discrimination suit.1 However, this past December, in State of New Jersey v. Ivonne Saavedra,2 the Superior Court of New Jersey, Appellate Division, ruled that the qualified privilege should not be applied to protect a criminal defendant from a grand jury indictment for “official misconduct” for having taken those documents to support a retaliatory discharge claim.

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From: New Jersey Court Rules Individual Can Be Criminally Prosecuted for Taking Confidential Information to Support Civil Whistleblower Claims

    

By cjackson@littler.com

Effective January 1, 2014, as a result of an Ordinance passed by the citizens of the City of SeaTac, Washington, certain transportation and hospitality employers in the City must provide their nonsupervisory employees working within the City limits a minimum wage of $15.00 per hour and paid sick and safe leave, among other benefits.

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From: $15.00 Minimum Wage and Mandatory Paid Sick and Safe Leave for Transportation and Hospitality Workers Take Effect in City of SeaTac