By cjackson@littler.com

New Jersey employers now have important new compliance responsibilities related to the 2012 amendments to the New Jersey Equal Pay Act. Effective January 6, 2014, employers must provide notice to employees of their right to be free from gender discrimination in the workplace, including inequity or bias in pay, compensation, benefits or other terms and conditions of employment under existing federal and state laws. The Department of Labor and Workforce Development (LWD) published the required notice and related regulations in the New Jersey Register.

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From: New Jersey Law Now Requires Employers to Post and Notify Employees of Gender Equity Laws

    

By cjackson@littler.com

New laws that went into effect on January 1, 2014, are a harbinger of what employers may expect to see in the coming year regarding workplace privacy: more restrictions on access to applicants’ and employees’ criminal history, credit information, and personal social media content. To further complicate the challenges of addressing privacy in the workplace, employers will be required to grapple with next-generation issues raised by the use of social media as a business tool and the increasing adoption of “bring-your-own-device” (BYOD) programs. As reflecte

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From: Workplace Privacy 2014: What’s New and What Employers May Expect

    

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From: Don�t Feel Sorry for the Part-Time Worker, Part-timers happier in many ways than full-time colleagues

    

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From: Job Creation to Slow, but Many HR, Health Care Openings Expected

    

By cjackson@littler.com

In Sharp v. Commissioner,1 the United States Tax Court once again demonstrated the importance of carefully crafting settlement agreements and reaffirmed that emotional distress damages are taxable income to the recipient.

Background Facts

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From: U.S. Tax Court Decision Shows Importance of Carefully Drafting Settlement Agreements

    

By tgelbman@littler.com

In 2013, the ballooning number of employment class actions illuminated the sea change in Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) litigation. The FCRA was enacted in 1970 during President Nixon’s administration, and is hardly in its adolescence. FCRA claims against employers, even class action lawsuits, are far from novel. Historically, though, such employment claims were infrequent and did not distract the plaintiff’s bar from the feeding frenzy provided by wage and hour laws. Now, the storm clouds undoubtedly are gathering under the FCRA, and thus the investment by

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From: Weathering the Sea Change in Fair Credit Reporting Act Litigation in 2014