Employees cannot collect unpaid wages under the California Private Attorneys General Act (PAGA), the California Supreme Court has ruled. PAGA allows workers to seek civil penalties for labor code violations on behalf of the state, but they must pursue back wages in separate actions against their employers.
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/shrm/hrnews/~3/jG7yArtPDQU/california-employees-can-not-seek-back-pay-under-paga.aspx

A warehouse worker who was fired shortly after telling his employer of a lifting restriction can keep a $550,000 jury award for punitive damages, a California appellate court ruled.
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/shrm/california/~3/P2-rQxEaZMU/california-court-upholds-large-jury-award-in-disability-bias-case.aspx

Employers would have a difficult time classifying workers as independent contractors under a bill that the California Senate passed on Sept. 10. Gig-economy businesses, such as Uber and Lyft, oppose the bill because their drivers would be deemed employees under the proposed legislation.
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/shrm/california/~3/HVKtzy1fm78/california-senate-passes-independent-contractor-bill.aspx

As the federal government focuses on deregulatory actions, California municipalities have moved forward with local laws that provide more protections for employees.
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/shrm/california/~3/2iOUkEP1Vs8/cities-in-california-and-beyond-continue-to-expand-workplace-protections.aspx

California legislators have until Sept. 13 to pass any measures they are considering this session, and Gov. Gavin Newsom has until Oct. 13 to sign or veto bills. Here’s an update on the status of key workplace-related bills that would create compliance obligations for employers in the state.
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/shrm/california/~3/YqFpCVqbT3Y/california-legislative-update-2019.aspx

California plaintiffs’ attorneys continue to be drawn to wage and hour cases, due to the high likelihood that class and collective actions will be certified and result in large payouts. Here’s what employers can do to reduce their risk of facing expensive litigation.
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/shrm/california/~3/0flyv-ZFdy4/tips-for-california-employers-to-avoid-costly-wage-and-hour-lawsuits.aspx

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Pac-12 Conference don’t have to pay a college football player minimum wage and overtime premiums under federal or California wage laws. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals recently affirmed dismissal of the athlete’s lawsuit for failure to state a legal claim.
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/shrm/california/~3/wzlXxrpqchs/college-football-player-is-not-ncaa-employee.aspx

Low unemployment rates and other workplace issues are creating major hurdles for California employers that want to attract and retain top talent. In this challenging environment, businesses should consider developing proactive and creative recruitment and retention strategies.
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/shrm/california/~3/1CZx4IwxVOU/california-employers-urged-to-be-proactive-with-hiring-and-retention.aspx

California legislators have until Sept. 13 to pass any measures they are considering this session, and Gov. Gavin Newsom has until Oct. 13 to sign or veto bills. As usual, lawmakers in the Golden State are considering a number of workplace-related bills that would create compliance obligations for employers in the state.
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/shrm/california/~3/C17PP1v0tms/california-employers-should-be-tracking-these-6-bills.aspx

When managing employees’ off-duty conduct, California HR professionals must navigate a lot of gray areas, particularly since the state’s privacy rules protect workers when they engage in certain lawful off-duty activities.
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/shrm/california/~3/H1Fa_3e-W8U/can-california-employers-regulate-worker-off-duty-conduct.aspx