Entries by SHRM.org

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Facial Analysis Technology in the Workplace Brings Risks

Facial recognition technology has been under the microscope as organizations and lawmakers re-evaluate its use in the wake of global protests about racial injustice. Technology giants Amazon, IBM and Microsoft all recently announced that they would stop selling facial recognition technology to police departments in the United States, citing the technology’s potential for violating human rights and concerns about racial profiling.

Navigating the New Normal in International Business Travel

What can your company expect in terms of your employees’ ability to travel internationally as parts of the world begin to come out of months of lockdown?
And what will the ongoing restrictions and changes in everyday life mean for your company’s ability to transfer or hire new foreign national talent in key areas? Only time will tell exactly what will happen, but we are beginning to see patterns and hints of what is to come.

Don’t Be a Bobblehead

Many HR pros act like bobbleheads within their organizations, says Steve Browne, SHRM-SCP, a director-at-large on the Society for Human Resource Management’s Board of Directors and vice president of human resources at LaRosa’s Inc. They nod in acceptance of senior management because they don’t want to rock the boat. In an excerpt from his second book, HR Rising!! (SHRM, 2020), Browne encourages HR professionals to take more risks at work.

As Jobs Disappear, Employees Hang On to What They Have

​Employees spooked by continuing high unemployment are holding on to the jobs they have at rates not seen in nearly a decade. While typically a sign of employee loyalty, low turnover these days can also signal fear, hopelessness and stagnation. Employers can head off those negative feelings and maintain morale and energy in the workplace by communicating with empathy and giving employees more control over decisions, experts say.

The Future of Remote Work in India

​When Tata Consultancy Services, India’s largest infotech and outsourcing company with approximately 450,000 employees, reported recently that it would move 75 percent of its employees to work from home permanently by 2025, it created a stir. But most HR experts think Tata will be the exception, not the rule.To be sure, experts believe that work from home—which many companies in India strictly prohibited until earlier this year—will be more common once COVID-19 is over. Employers can lower offic